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June 1, 2020

What is the Boogaloo Boys Movement?

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On April 11, police in Texarkana, Texas, arrested a man whose Facebook page had a Boogaloo reference for threatening to ambush and kill a police officer in a Facebook Live video. While “Boogeloo” supporters say they do not support violence, law enforcement officials say they have thwarted attempts to shoot down plots by people with ties to the movement, or at least used its terminology. The term has been widely accepted since it was adopted by a group of white supremacists last year. The Tech Transparency Project, which tracks technology companies, found that 125 Facebook “Boogaloo related” groups had attracted tens of thousands of members in the past 30 days.

While Boogaloo supporters claim they are not really advocating violence, law enforcement officials say they have foiled plots against people with ties to the movement, or at least used its terminology. On April 11, police in Texarkana, Texas, arrested a man with a Facebook page containing a “BoogALoo” reference after he threatened to ambush and kill a police officer in a Facebook Live video. The term has been adopted by white supremacist groups, which adopted it last year.

The Tech Transparency Project, which tracks technology companies, found that 125 Facebook-related groups had attracted tens of thousands of members in the previous 30 days. But what really struck me at the meeting was the “BoogALoo” fan base. An elderly woman and grandmother smiled proudly at a group of girls aged between eight and nine holding signs that read “Sisolak sucks.

In relation to this pandemic, I pointed out that the existing political groups, which already exist and rename themselves’ Boogaloo Boys’, are all pointing to the same goal. Their goal has become a self-proclaimed “patriotic” group with the common goal of targeting violent uprisings with right-wing militias in their own backyard. They are accelerationists who hope to incite what they call an “anti-immigrant, anti-racism, pro-freedom movement” in the United States.

What happens is that you have white-power activists who are then portrayed as racism – neutral militia members, but you also have people who join the militia. If you want to call out far-right groups, why do you call them extremists, they make it harder for you because you say you want them to be called that. This is a way to rename your militia movement, and I thought of it when I tweeted this.

On Friday night, members of a far-right group calling for violence were in the crowd holding AK-47s. A longtime local organizer, who told Queen’s City Nerve that he did not want to take part in the protests because of his suspicious background, said one of the blacks standing in front of him was then arrested by police. Others implied that the event was simply a misguided attempt to support the movement and was hijacked by anarchists and others who were only there to start a struggle.

A group called Justice for Police Brutality held a protest on Facebook called “Justice for George Floyd,” which was monitored and supervised by the Toronto Police Service and the Canadian Civil Liberties Union of Ontario (CCLU). We have also trawled through images of the weekend protests, and we have evidence that the loosely organized Boogaloo movement is using the 1980s film sequence as a code word for a second civil war. Hawaiian shirts and Leis stood in the crowd that formed to protest the lockdown order of COVID-19. They were also seen carrying high-powered rifles, carrying tactical equipment and carrying them in their pockets and on their backs.

A loose movement that uses an 80s movie sequence as a code word for a second civil war is just the latest in a long line of extremists who use armed protests and – at home – orders as platforms. Like other movements that once lived largely in the corners of the Internet, they have used social unrest and economic disasters caused by pandemics to make their violent messages public. The anti-government “Boogaloo” movement, which looks like a signature, should get attention. K, a movement that grew out of the anti-war protests in Ferguson, Missouri in the late 1990s and early 2000s, has little chance of surviving its implosion after the Unite the Right rally in 2017.

The Boogaloo meme, which emerged from the movement of heavily armed protesters, began as an attempt to model itself after the anti-war protests in Ferguson, Missouri, in the late 1990s and early 2000s. But it seems to differ from the movement that has emerged around K, because failed Congressional candidate Paul Nehlen, a white nationalist from Wisconsin, has long used the word “Boogalsoo” on his Telegram channel and is tolerated by extremists as a platform for mockery and ridicule. Racial warfare is not so much about race as it is about poles, according to a new study by the Center for American Progress.
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